Numero Group: By The Numbers


A Place Called Bad: The Complete Works of OZ Punk Pioneers, The Scientists (Pre-Order + Exclusives)
May 16, 2016, 4:21 pm
Filed under: Newsworthy, The Scientists

“The Scientists proved to me that rock ‘n’ roll could be played by gentlemen in fine silk shirts half unbuttoned and still be dirty, cool and real.”
—Thurston Moore

“They wrote fantastic singles and looked like they just crawled out of the ooze. What more could you ask for?”
—Warren Ellis

“The Scientists turned my head around and made a man out of me! They grew hair on my palms and made my socks stink!”
—Jon Spencer

With a sound that was swampy, primal and modern-urban all at once—as much in the tradition of rock n’ roll and punk rock as it was a rejection of those things, the Scientists’ formula was as universal as it was specific to their own experience. The themes of getting wasted, driving around in hotted-up cars, being trapped in crap jobs, and paranoia were their subject matter. Machine throb bass and drums with jagged car-wreck guitars were their modus operandi. Fitting into no place or time they spurned all but the most rudimentary and elemental of rock structures to create a sound all their own.

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The Scientists: A Place Called Bad 

4CD includes complete studio recordings, live recordings, and a previously unissued set from Adelaide UniBar, plus dozens of previously unpublished photographs, discography, and fold out Perth Punk family tree.

2LP version boils the box down to 23 essentials, plus unpublished photographs, discography, and fold out Perth Punk family tree.

Deluxe mail-order only version includes previously unissued Cheap Nasties 7″ EP (limited to 1000) or 10 song cassette (limited to 100)!

 



Introducing Australian Punk Pioneers, The Scientists
August 19, 2015, 11:40 am
Filed under: The Scientists | Tags: , , ,

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The Scientists went through many incarnations in their nine-year history but are remembered mostly for the lineup that existed from 1981 to 1985. Kim Salmon, Tony Thewlis, Boris Sujdovic and Brett Rixon together had the peculiar chemistry that produced the classics, Swampland, Happy Hour, Blood Red River and We Had Love. With a sound that was swampy, primal and modern-urban all at once—as much in the tradition of rock and roll and punk rock as it was a rejection of those things, the Scientists’ formula was as universal as it was specific to their own experience. They were about what it was like to be young and living in modern times in an Australian urban/suburban environment. The themes of getting wasted on alcohol and drugs, driving round in hotted-up cars, being trapped in crap jobs and paranoia were their subject matter. Machine throb bass and drums with jagged car-wreck guitars were their modus operandi. Fitting into no place or time they spurned all but the most rudimentary and elemental of rock structures along with other peoples modes of embellishment. They rejected the contemporary sound and look and so consequently were never able to carry around baggage that would allow them to date.

“The Scientist proved to me that rock n roll could be played by gentlemen in fine silk shirts half unbuttoned and still be dirty, cool and real.”—Thurston Moore

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The Scientists’ 1981 wild debut bewildered Perth, Australia’s punters with its charging anthems centered on themes of young love and alienation. Obvious in its rebellion yet more pop than punk, the self-titled “Pink Album” deftly embodied the tough-yet-danceable outsider aura of The Ramones, and its unheard of, feverish clip shook the shores of the geographically confined Swan Coastal Plain of down under. Recorded just as the lineup of guitarist-vocalist Kim Salmon (The Cheap Nasties), drummer James Baker (The Victims) and bassist Ian Sharples were breaking up, the album stands as a testament to the contagious chops of Perth’s swelling pool of musical talent, and to the promise of Salmon’s unwavering vision that would become one of the most celebrated acts of the Aussie underground.

“They wrote fantastic singles and looked like they just crawled out of the ooze. What more could you ask for?”—Warren Ellis

Purchase The Scientists [“The Pink Album”] now

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After trekking east from the suburbs of Perth to take new root in Sydney, in 1983 the Scientists hooked up with producer Chris Logan, who’s credited Blood Red River’s imposing sonic girth and rumbling low end, and premier Aussie punk label Au Go Go for an album that would define their unmistakably swampy, psychotic aura. These six songs revisited band leader Kim Salmon’s interest in the Cramps and the Stooges, while adding in the repetitive dementia of Suicide and elements of cow punk twang, with Salmon’s distinctly unrefined Australian accent snarling tales of lust, confusion, and angst.

“The Scientists turned my head around and made a man out of me! They grew hair on my palms and made my socks stink!”—Jon Spencer

Purchase Blood Red River here.



Australian Punk Icons the Scientists Announce Oz Shows
July 9, 2015, 1:51 pm
Filed under: The Scientists

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“The Scientists turned my head around and made a man out of me! They grew hair on my palms and made my socks stink!”—Jon Spencer

“They wrote fantastic singles and looked like they just crawled out of the ooze. What more could you ask for?”—Warren Ellis

“The Scientists proved to me that rock n roll could be played by gentlemen in fine silk shirts half unbuttoned and still be dirty, cool and real.”—Thurston Moore

Much will be said by us (and others) regarding Perth-Punk progenitors The Scientists in the months to come, but we should start by saying that the Oz ensemble will be playing two shows in the Motherland this Summer. First, the group’s original line-up will reunite on the stage of the Corner Hotel (57 Swan Street, Melbourne) on July 18th and a month or so later at the Factory Theatre (105 Victoria Rd, Sydney) on August 28th. Meanwhile, the group’s self-titled debut as well as their 1983 follow-up, Blood Red River, are available for pre-order on our website now. Copies will begin shipping later in the month.